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cjwho:

Rain Shelter House, Japan by y+M | via

From the architect: Location of the house is Yonago-city Sanin area at the foot of Mt. Daisen which has national park. This area has much rain throughout the year. In winter it blows a chill northwest wind and it snows a lot. The site is on a hill. So the scenery is wonderful but it gets the strong afternoon sunlight.

We planned the house there where client family (married couple, their two children and wife’s mother who newly live together) lives.

We planned the house as divided/parted one. That architecture makes some benefits for the client such as keeping adequate privacy among the family. And client can sleep without any concern for disturbing noise of the other family members after his/her night shift work.
Diagram

We designed the gabled folded-plate big roof which reaches ground at its one side on each “divided house.” The roof keeps off rain throughout the year, chill northwest wind and snow in winter and strong afternoon sunlight in summer. And the roof can keep the client’s privacy from neighbor houses.

In addition, natural sunlight comes in through the gap between the roof and “divided houses.” So that inside the house is bright enough in daytime without lightings.

Photography: Yohei Sasakura / Sasa no kurasha

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Kasia Struss photographed by Willy Vanderperre for Jil Sander Spring 2008

(Source: vandercunt, via woluf)

Anonymous said: You're a stupid nigger. You hate white people so much but without them you wouldn't have the McDonald's you so clearly love you fat fucking loser

defcise:

paranormal-blacktivity:

If it weren’t for black people you wouldn’t have:

  • air conditioning unit: Frederick M. Jones; July 12, 1949
  • almanac: Benjamin Banneker; Approx 1791
  • auto cut-off switch: Granville T. Woods; January 1,1839
  • auto fishing devise: G. Cook; May 30, 1899
  • automatic gear shift: Richard Spikes; February 28, 1932
  • baby buggy: W.H. Richardson; June 18, 1899
  • bicycle frame: L.R. Johnson; Octber 10, 1899
  • biscuit cutter: A.P. Ashbourne; November 30, 1875
  • blood plasma bag: Charles Drew; Approx. 1945
  • cellular phone: Henry T. Sampson; July 6, 1971
  • chamber commode: T. Elkins; January 3, 1897
  • clothes dryer: G. T. Sampson; June 6, 1862
  • curtain rod: S. R. Scratton; November 30, 1889
  • curtain rod support: William S. Grant; August 4, 1896
  • door knob: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • door stop: O. Dorsey; December 10, 1878
  • dust pan: Lawrence P. Ray; August 3, 1897
  • egg beater: Willie Johnson; February 5, 1884
  • electric lampbulb: Lewis Latimer; March 21, 1882
  • elevator: Alexander Miles; October 11, 1867
  • eye protector: P. Johnson; November 2, 1880
  • fire escape ladder: J. W. Winters; May 7, 1878
  • fire extinguisher: T. Marshall; October 26, 1872
  • folding bed: L. C. Bailey; July 18, 1899
  • folding chair: Brody & Surgwar; June 11, 1889
  • fountain pen: W. B. Purvis; January 7, 1890
  • furniture caster: O. A. Fisher; 1878
  • gas mask: Garrett Morgan; October 13, 1914
  • golf tee: T. Grant; December 12, 1899
  • guitar: Robert F. Flemming, Jr. March 3, 1886
  • hair brush: Lydia O. Newman; November 15,18–
  • hand stamp: Walter B. Purvis; February 27, 1883
  • horse shoe: J. Ricks; March 30, 1885
  • ice cream scooper: A. L. Cralle; February 2, 1897
  • improv. sugar making: Norbet Rillieux; December 10, 1846
  • insect-destroyer gun: A. C. Richard; February 28, 1899
  • ironing board: Sarah Boone; December 30, 1887
  • key chain: F. J. Loudin; January 9, 1894
  • lantern: Michael C. Harvey; August 19, 1884
  • lawn mower: L. A. Burr; May 19, 1889
  • lawn sprinkler: J. W. Smith; May 4, 1897
  • lemon squeezer: J. Thomas White; December 8, 1893
  • lock: W. A. Martin; July 23, 18–
  • lubricating cup: Ellijah McCoy; November 15, 1895
  • lunch pail: James Robinson; 1887
  • mail box: Paul L. Downing; October 27, 1891
  • mop: Thomas W. Stewart; June 11, 1893
  • motor: Frederick M. Jones; June 27, 1939
  • peanut butter: George Washington Carver; 1896
  • pencil sharpener: J. L. Love; November 23, 1897
  • record player arm: Joseph Hunger Dickenson January 8, 1819
  • refrigerator: J. Standard; June 14, 1891
  • riding saddles: W. D. Davis; October 6, 1895
  • rolling pin: John W. Reed; 1864
  • shampoo headrest: C. O. Bailiff; October 11, 1898
  • spark plug: Edmond Berger; February 2, 1839
  • stethoscope: Imhotep; Ancient Egypt
  • stove: T. A. Carrington; July 25, 1876
  • straightening comb: Madam C. J. Walker; Approx 1905
  • street sweeper: Charles B. Brooks; March 17, 1890
  • phone transmitter: Granville T. Woods; December 2, 1884
  • thermostat control: Frederick M. Jones; February 23, 1960
  • traffic light: Garrett Morgan; November 20, 1923
  • tricycle: M. A. Cherry; May 6, 1886
  • typewriter: Burridge & Marshman; April 7, 1885

BUT OH MAN WHAT WILL WE DO WITHOUT MCDONALDS :(((

🙌

gaksdesigns:

Glass sculptures by Ben Young.

"There are many reasons why religious educations fail people—hypocrisy, loss of faith, etc, etc. For some of us, however, I think they just fail for no reason at all. We are the wrong clay for that particular mold. Sheep may stray, they may fall off cliffs, they may be eaten by wolves, but some of us are just born goats."

- Ursula Vernon (via anthean)

(Source: fuckyeahursulavernon, via atheismfuckyeah)